Pandemic Road: Week Four, Part Two

Since I am spending extra time at home, I thought I would share a second weekly blog with you, my dear readers. You’re Welcome!

I had an exciting outing this morning. No, I didn’t break any of the rules for “staying home”. I took my cat, Hannah, to the vet. There’s nothing wrong with her. It was a routine visit and it got both her and I out of the house. I was much more excited about this than she was.

Of course, since we are in the middle of the pandemic, I can’t really say the visit was routine for me. Instead of walking into the lobby of the vet’s office, I parked my car in the parking lot. Then I called inside to the receptionist to let them know I was there. Minutes later a vet tech came out to my car, picked up the cat carrier and disappeared into a side door of the clinic. I waited outside while my little ball of fur was being treated. After a few minutes, the same vet tech brought Hannah in her carrier back out to my car. I called back in to the receptionist to make sure they had my credit card on file and drove away. During the drive home, Hannah kept looking at me as if I and all humans had lost our collective minds. Now that we are back home, Hannah is seeing her way to forgive me for disrupting her daily routine. A long nap in a sunny windowsill seems to be doing the trick.

I am reminded of a Facebook saying I saw this morning:

So You’re staying inside, practicing social distancing, and cleaning yourself? Congratulations my friend, you’ve become a house cat.

On the downside of the pandemic, I have received notice that two art exhibitions I had been selected to take part in this spring have been postponed, delayed, whatever until things return to normal. In the first instance I have a piece of collage art that was selected to display in an exhibition at Rice University. In the second instance I have an essay that was part of an art and literature exhibition at the Holocaust Museum Houston. Bummer, Bummer, Bummer.

Of course on the upside I am healthy and safe. All of my close friends and family are healthy and safe. I can still take long walks outside and I have started taking advantage of “Senior Shopping Hours”! Woo Hoo!

I hope all of you are staying safe, healthy and happy!

Until next week.……

Pandemic Road: Week Three

Last week I wrote about going out to eat at a restaurant where all patrons were spaced out, food was cooked. Wasn’t that nice? I really enjoyed it. Today as I walk around the neighborhood, I see many signs like this one. Many shops are closed. The gym that I like to attend is closed. Movie theaters are closed. The Houston Theatre District has ground to a halt.

This provides me with a challenge. What to do with myself?

I accept this challenge. I am finding things to do every day. Today I went to a mid‐day mindfulness meditation group. There were six of us and we spaced ourselves out and used hand sanitizer and no one sneezed or coughed. We did not hug each other as we usually do, but it felt good to be in this group of people who are all working our way through these times that are like no other.

Tuesday was St. Patrick’s Day. By then bars were closed and restaurants were open on a take out/delivery option only. I even tried to ask that if I walked into a restaurant and placed an order to go, could I get a drink at the bar. NONONO! Okay, you only have to tell me once. Apparently the local pandemic police are really strict about that. However, I want to support local businesses that may be hurting right now. So, I am happy to order take out from my favorite restaurants.

Welcome to 100% Taquito and St. Patrick’s Day.

You may remember that I wrote about 100% Taquitos as my go to restaurant for El Dia De Los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Now they are my new favorite restaurant for St. Patrick’s Day. As you can see the taxi with the leprechaun on top and skeletons inside is surrounded by tables that have been stacked up so no one coming in for take out will be able to sit down. On top of the front of the taxi are two floor mats as further evidence of the seating area not being open. Also, all employees who prepared the food wore gloves. Again, I ordered food that required cooking.

As you can see, instead of the well known phrase, “Kiss Me, I’m Irish”, your only requirement at 100% Taquitos is to buy tacos. I did. My dear friend and I both bought vegetarian tacos. We took them home and ate them outside on the balcony. They were delicious.

As I left 100% Taquito with tacos in hand, I passed this cute doggie called “Lucky”. I didn’t pat him on the head, because I was respecting his social distance. But I did wave good‐bye. I will continue to go by my favorite local restaurants and support them with my take out orders.

What local businesses are you supporting during this unusual time?

Until next week.….

Pandemic Road

I don’t remember where I first heard of the “curse”. However, I do remember reading about it in several novels by Terry Pratchett. Here is the curse:

May you live in interesting times.

This is now the curse where we find ourselves. Last night I did something that may in a few short days be considered quite risky.

I went to the Theater District of Houston. My Dear Friend and I went to dinner at a restaurant called the Blue Fish. It was crowded. Lots of folks enjoying the sushi and other delectable items. My We shared the grilled salmon.

Then we went across the street to the Wortham Center and saw a work that had been commissioned by the Houston Grand Opera. It was called Marian’s Song.

This short opera told a part of the story about Marian Anderson. She was one of the most celebrated singers of the 20th century who broke racial barriers throughout her career. This was a fusion of opera, spoken word and multimedia projections. Deborah D.E.E.P. Mouton wrote the libretto. The performance was inspiring. I was moved. I hope this work grows and moves into the arena of operas around the world. I am looking forward to hearing Ms. Mouton speak at the March meeting of the Women in the Visual and Literary Arts (WiVLA).

What was so risky? I went out in public. I washed my hands frequently. I tried not to touch door knobs. I have been practicing punching elevator buttons with my knuckle. The coravirus or COVID‐19 could pop up anywhere.

This week I have gotten used to going to any grocery or drug store and seeing people with masks and/or gloves. There is no hand sanitizer, water, toilet paper, etc. available for purchase. I have my small supply. I wash my hands frequently. I am getting to know local pharmacists so they will tell me when the next shipment of supplies is due. Every time I get home, the first thing I do is wash my hands. I am amazed at how many people don’t know how to wash their hands. Isn’t this one of the activities of daily living that we all should have mastered by.….I don’t know.……age 5 or so?

The fear is palpable.

Is this the price I pay because I love living in a big city? I love the Theater District in downtown Houston. What if this all gets worse and performances are cancelled/delayed? Many of the arts were adversely affected by Hurricane Harvey. What could a pandemic do to them?

As I sit at here, having washed my hands twice since getting home this afternoon, I contemplate this. I plan as best I can and I contemplate.

Even my cat, Hannah, is showing an interest in how I keep the two of us safe.

Next weekend my Dear Friend and I have tickets for the Houston Ballet and Houston Symphony. I still plan on attending both. I will wash my hands, use hand sanitizer and whatever else I need to do. I still love life in a big international city. We have survived SARS, Y2K, and several hurricanes. When faced with a hurricane, all one can do is grab supplies and hunker down until the danger is passed. We have many more options to survive a pandemic. We will survive COVID‐19. We’re Texans by God. Remember the Alamo! I will keep you posted on how it goes.

Until next week.……