Flinging and Swinging into Spring

It is now officially Spring! I hope everyone had a nice Vernal Equinox. Did you run around outside picking flowers and dancing? I didn’t either. Have you planted all of your spring flowers and gardens? Again…me neither.

However, I have been walking. I have walked around my neighborhood, I have walked at Bayou Bend, I have walked around the grounds at Rienzi. I have observed nature and art. Yes, sometimes nature is art and sometimes art is nature. Think about it.……you’ll get it. I may not have planted any spring garden, but the fabulous people who work for the Museum of Fine Arts have put a lot of work into the Gardens at Bayou Bend and the Rienzi. As you can tell I walked among the Goddesses and Muses (great inspiration for writing) and took lots of pictures of flowers and butterflies.

For those of you who are not in the know about Houston culture, Bayou Bend is owned by the MFAH and showcases the home and gardens of the Great Dame of H Town, Miss Ima Hogg. Yes, for anyone who is not knowledgeable about Houston culture, this was a real woman (stop that giggling now!) who had lots of money and spent it on a beautiful home, the Houston Symphony, the Houston Ballet, among other things. I can paraphrase the line from the movie Steel Magnolias and say that Miss Hogg “had more money than God” and I don’t think she wasted a penny. When she died, she left her home full of art works and antiques to the MFAH. The ongoing success of the Houston Symphony and Houston Ballet speak for themselves.

The Rienzi is another such home that is also located in River Oaks. Formerly the home of philanthropists Carroll Sterling Masterson and Harris Masterson III. I don’t know as much about them as I do about Miss Ima Hogg, but they also left a beautiful home full of art and antiques plus acres of beautiful gardens to the MFAH.

The exciting part about all of this walking is that I feel really good! I have successfully survived gastric sleeve surgery, losing weight and can get up and move! I am literally having a Spring Fling! My once upon a time arthritic knee is MUCH better.

I first started going on long walks when I was about 12 years old. You know, that age when just no one understands you and you almost sprain a muscle in your face from your eyes rolling so much at everything everyone tries to tell you? Just gotta love those preteen years. And yes, I was just that kind of preteen. Yes, I have matured much since those days. No…really!

Anyway, I would go for long walks around the neighborhood. There was a shopping center and an 18‐hole golf course. Lots of places to walk around and get lost in the scenery and sort out my pubescent thoughts. Mom and I both had a nice break from each other. My siblings never followed me on these outings. What’s not to love.

Besides, it doesn’t cost anything to walk. Except there is sometimes an admission fee. It is actually good for you. Except for when the refineries in Deer Park are on fire and the air is filled with smoke and benzene. Don’t forget to breathe deep!

So, I hope you have enjoyed all of these pictures of flowers and springtime. Soon enough it will be summer and hurricane season and it will be 100 degrees in the shade.……you get the idea. I am going to walk as much as possible until that time gets here!

Until next week.……

Surrealism and the Bowler Hat

I read with great interest Melanie’s most recent blog post about hypnagogia. In case you need a brief refresher hypnagogia refers to the state between wakefulness and sleep. It is a state where people attempt to grasp creative ideas that percolate up from the subconscious and unconscious. Melanie mentioned she keeps a journal by her bed to capture those early morning creative glimmerings.

I also have a journal by my bed. I use it to capture dreams. Is there a hard and fast difference between dreams, creative glimmers, free thoughts? Maybe or maybe not. All can be included as fodder for writing prompts, ideas for painting or collage works, etc. However, reading about this type of free form writing reminds me of Surrealism in both art and writing.

Surrealism refers to the avant‐garde movement in art and literature which sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious mind. Often you will see surrealist art that juxtaposes images that you would not otherwise think of going together.

Miro’and Dali are some of the more popular surrealist artists. Of course there were women surrealists that never receive as much attention as the male artists. Many people consider Frida Kahlo to have been a surrealist painter. Gertrude Abercrombie was a painter who specialized in working with moons, cats and mysterious women. What’s not to love about pictures of moons, cats and mysterious women?

I must admit one of my all time favorite surrealist artists is Rene Magritte. This gentleman painted a lot of pictures of men in bowler hats. Sometimes he painted pictures of men in bowler hats without faces. Other times there are faces of men wearing bowler hats, but the face is hidden behind an apple or a dove. He also painted groups of men in bowler hats wearing black overcoats floating in air. Are they floating up or down? That’s open to interpretation.

I have recently become fascinated by the use of bowler hats in art and literature. Traditionally a man in a bowler hat is a version of the “every hat” worn by the “every man”. Informal. Practical. Combine the bowler hat with a skeleton and you have a bit of surrealist photography.

What about women who wear bowler hats. Think of Liza Minnelli in the movie Cabaret. What good is sitting alone in your room when you can come hear the music play?

Bowler hats are not traditional headgear for the “every woman”. When a woman wears a bowler hat, is she picking up on a surrealist life style? Looking for meaning in the unconscious? Gleaming insight and inspiration from the area between waking and sleeping? Can you find writing prompts inside a bowler? A male character in a mystery novel who wears a bowler hat is a hidebound traditionalist. Yet, a woman in the same novel wearing a bowler hat is a bit quirky and unusual.

Can you find inspiration and creativity just by wearing a bowler hat? Sounds good to me!

Until next week.….…

Art and Artists and Artworks, Oh My!

What a wonderful week!

It started off with my Dear Friend (DF) and I going out to the Cullen Performance Hall and listening to Annie Leibovitz talk about her photography while showing many examples of her work on a big screen. She is one of the artists I have made a point of following over the years. As you can see, I did not sit close enough to get a good picture of her while she spoke (yes, that is her down in the lower left corner), but what she had to say was fascinating. She discussed how she became a photographer, the places she has worked, the people she has worked with and those she has photographed. She talked about how the technical aspects of photography and the cameras have evolved since the 1970s. It was all interesting. I got a copy of her latest book, Annie Leibovitz At Work.

In the photo above, she is displaying a self‐portrait that she took in 1970 using one of her cameras. I guess today you would call it a “selfie”, but even that she does better than most folks do now with their fancy phones.

Thanks to Houston FotoFest and Brazos Bookstore for arranging this!

Then on Thursday it was another gray day. I guess I could have stayed home and worked on my writing, but what the heck.…I was ready for more ART! So DF and I jumped into his car and drove over to the Menil Collection. It used to be called the Menil Museum when there was just one building. Now there are five buildings and acres of greenspaces.

Unfortunately, they are very strict about not allowing any photographs taken inside any of the galleries. So you will just have to go and see the exhibits yourself. I was able to take pictures in the hallway so you can see some of the suffusion of light and “…natural illumination that varies with the weather, time of day and season”.

There are artworks by Magritte, Ernst, Picasso as well as art from ancient and medieval cultures. Best of all there were TWO, count them, TWO charcoal works by Georgia O’Keefe! Be still my fluttering heart!

The Menil Drawing Institute is a very interesting building. Again there is a focus on natural light and green spaces. The building also includes three courtyards that keep visitors surrounded by Mother Nature. There are benches everywhere for those who want to sit and draw or sit and meditate or sit and visit with friends or just sit.

While I love living in the middle of a large metropolitan city, I really appreciate the green spaces provided by a place like the Menil Collection.

After walking around the Menil Collection for approximately three hours, both DF and I were tired. We decided to rest and recharge by visiting a local restaurant that specializes in crepes.  It is called Sweet Paris and it is located in Highland Village. Since I am still recovering from gastric sleeve surgery, I ordered a bowl of Tomato Basil soup. DF had a Vegan Crepe. As we ate, we reviewed which pictures to include in this blog. All of these pictures were taken with my phone. I’m clearly not as talented as Annie Leibovitz, but I have fun. What a wonderful way to end a day of art and walking.

What a wonderful way to spend a gray day.

Slowly but surely I am even learning more about using a real digital camera for my personal photography. Later this month DF and I will take a photography journey through the Rienzi. Stay tuned!

Until next week.….

Rainy Days and Color

The weather in Houston can be so mixed. Except for the summer. During the summer temperatures are hot and the humidity is high. The only variation involves hurricanes and tropical disturbances. Those are no fun.

Yet, this time of year the weather can be cold or warm or rainy or beautifully sunny. Just the other day I posted on Facebook about how beautiful the day was with full sunshine and comfortably cool temperatures. The rest of the country was experiencing snow, ice, more snow and then blizzards.

This week here in Houston it is rainy. It was rainy yesterday and it is still rainy today. It will be rainy for a couple of more days. Sometimes it might just be cloudy, but then it will rain again. Not tropical disturbance rainy or hurricane rainy. No flooding. No worries. Just rain.

The days become gray. Dull, gray, dreary, rainy days. It is almost as if gray is the only color in the world. Is it just my imagination or has all the color been sucked out of the cars in the parking lot? Do you see any color there?

Really?

That is why my Dear Friend (DF) and I went to the Houston Museum of Natural Science this week and caught the exhibition called Biophilia.

What is Biophilia? I am so glad you asked.

The artist Christopher Marley has made a career of going out into nature all over the world and finding animals, bugs, water creatures, land creatures, flying creatures and snakes. Then, by capturing the innate beauty and color that naturally exists in nature, he makes beautiful art.

In the exhibition Marley defines Biophilia as, “.….an abiding reverence and appreciation for the creations with which we share our planet.”

I didn’t take enough pictures to do justice to the colorful array of art pieces that are shown in this exhibition. You will see bright blues, yellows, greens. Then you will see some water creatures and snakes that form some of the most fascinating geometric shapes. There are birds with bright feathers and sometimes feathers without the birds.

I was reminded in the middle of this very gray day that there really is a lot of color in nature. As I study art history classes at the Glassell School of Art, I am reminded that mere mortals can only strive to reproduce the magnificent colors that we see around us in nature.

Sometimes we get close. Sometimes, if you pay attention to the details, you will see that humans can make some very interesting objects. I took this last picture when visiting at a friend’s house. The house was built in 1938 and it still has some of the original glass door knobs. With the play of light and shadows this could look like some of the creatures that I saw in Biophilia or maybe it is just a pretty picture all to itself. Humans and nature can make very good artistic partners when they try.

By the way, just in case you were wondering.….Even though the animals in Marley’s artwork are no longer living, no animals were harmed in order to create this body of work. Here’s a quote from a recent NPR story:

Marley built a network of breeders, zoos, aquariums and importers who all send him their dead. He’s very clear that he only uses reclaimed specimens that have died from natural causes or been caught as fishing bycatch, and doesn’t buy from hunters.”

Likewise I assure you that no doorknobs were harmed while I was taking pictures of them. Just in case you were wondering.

Until next week.….

Death Becomes Me.……and Her!

I’m currently reading a very interesting book. It’s called Smoke Gets In Your Eyes: and Other Lessons from the Crematory by Caitlin Doughty. Morbid? Maybe. But interesting. So interesting that I also plan on reading another book by the same author called, From Here To Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death.

Many people who know me are aware that I have a bit of a history with the funeral industry. To begin with, back in Memphis, Tennessee, my maternal relatives owned a complicated array of businesses including a funeral home. My mother worked at this funeral home until she met and married my father who was a funeral director. Over the years I knew the people at this funeral home well enough that they gave me a part‐time job when I was working on my undergraduate degree at the University of Memphis where I majored in Social Work.

No, I was not allowed anywhere near the dearly departed. I answered a PBX machine and directed phone calls wherever they needed to go. Yes, there were a few odd phone calls along the way. No, I told the nice lady who called and asked, we don’t sell used dentures.

Did I mention this was Memphis Funeral Home. You think you have never heard of it, but you have. This was the funeral home that buried Elvis Presley. My one celebrity claim to fame. No, I never met Elvis and I did not work there while his funeral service took place. Elvis died in 1977 and I worked the PBX machine in 1978.

It was an interesting place to work. The people who work in funeral services have very unique talents. They work with the dead and grieving all day long. They counsel and they listen. It takes a special person to do this.

After graduation I moved to Houston and worked for a funeral corporation. Since I had a Social Work degree and the job placed me in the Accounting Department, I only stayed there about four months.

When I was getting my Masters degree in Social Work from the University of Houston, I had an internship for two semesters with a local hospice. Part of my qualifications included the fact that I had experience with the funeral industry and would be comfortable around death.

Later as an employee for local government, I documented the history of County Poor Farms and Cemeteries. This document can still be found within the Harris County Archives and there is a historical marker in the County Cemetery.

As a Social Worker I often worked in areas that many people find uncomfortable, but I found most comfortable. Today I find all this to be very valuable experience in my new career as a Writer.

Last June when Melanie and I made the road trip to Colorado, we visited my niece who works at a Denver Bookstore. We ate lunch at a restaurant called “Linger”. This restaurant is housed in a historical building that used to be a mortuary.

We both share an affinity for Halloween. She is her own unique and interesting person and it has been wonderful to get to know her as a 20‐something adult.

Imagine my surprise when Becca texted me to let me know that this fall she was going back to school to study Mortuary Science. I asked her if I had been a bad role model for her, but if I was then I was a darn proud bad role model!

Becca has two years of studies ahead of her, but she is very bright and very smart. I can’t wait to see how this next chapter in her life turns out. I will remain “a proud bad role model” and support her any way I can.

Until next week.….

Revising Paths

Every so often the road I am traveling on for this life journey takes an odd turn that I don’t always anticipate. Six months ago I would never have guessed that I would have the experience that I had last Monday.

My one road trip this week consists of traveling to the hospital and having gastric sleeve surgery. I had never planned on having this surgery. I was having a great time with my new career in retirement. I was having fun going all over the city of Houston and seeing whatever there was to see.

However, it was because I was enjoying my life so much that I made the decision to remove a large part of my stomach. According to the process outlined in Melanie’s last blog post, I moved out of my comfort zone, dealt with the fear of having any type of surgery, learned everything I could about this, and am now growing through the experience.

I plan on living a long time and want to be as healthy as I can be. I have a lot of writing to do. I don’t have time to worry about arthritis and high blood pressure as long as there is a safe way to improve my physical body. Being healthy frees up my mind and body to follow my bliss. I am very pleased to report that two days out from the surgery, I am feeling pretty good.

I am beginning some of the very many changes that need to happen in my life as a result of this surgery. I am finding out all the ways I can ingest protein and vitamins and hydration.

At first I was sent home from the hospital with several small pill cups that hold one ounce of water. I was told to drink an ounce of water every fifteen minutes. This would help guarantee that I was receiving enough hydration.

However, these cups are small and light weight. The small cups quickly became cat toys and were getting knocked off of tables and across the room.

That’s one of the many places where my Dear Friend (DF) stepped in to help. He brought me a shot glass that shows the measurements contained within an ounce. It is heavier than the hospital cups so it is not as easy to knock over. Also it helps me the measure all of the water, protein drinks, and fat free Greek yogurt that now comprise my daily diet.

I used to use shot glasses to measure out ingredients for vodka martinis or chocolate martinis. This will not happen again for at least a year. Having and enjoying many years of health is worth the trade off.

Now I measure everything that goes into my stomach. I have a notebook that I use to track when and how much I take in daily. I focus on protein and water. Chewable vitamins are very exciting when you’re on a liquid diet as part of recovery from surgery.

I am also keeping notes on this entire process. I wonder how much material I will have for future memoirs or personal essays? Writing about all of my new experiences helps me as I travel through the growth zone of this experience.

No, I don’t intend for my blog posts to become a “health journey” I am still focused on the writing process. However this week has hopefully made me a healthier person so I can live my life and have lots to write about.

Until next week.….….…

Classical Road Trip

I have always enjoyed a wide variety of music.

In my early childhood mother would send me off to dancing school where I would learn tap and jazz steps to any number of Broadway songs.

Then in my teens I terrorized mother with albums by such groups as Led Zepplin and singers like Alice Cooper. She was much less terrorized with musicians like Donovan and Melanie. Also, since I was living in Memphis, I would listen to Furry Lewis sing the blues at a local watering hole on a Saturday night. If you don’t know who any of these musicians are.…..don’t tell me. I will feel old. Just Google and try to keep up.

By the time I hit my early adult years, I added classical music to my growing repertoire. Mozart is my favorite composer. Bach and Strauss are high on my list as well. Evelyn Glennie is a Scottish virtuoso percussionist I have seen perform and I now adore her music.

Here is the problem. If you are like me and you remember when groups like the Beatles and the Stones made their debut performances in the USA, collecting music to enjoy at home can be a bit tricky. Over the years I have followed my favorite musicians through the days of LPs and 45s, 8 Track tapes, cassette tapes, and CDs. Now I am learning to download. I prefer CDs.

Even though I live in a large metropolitan area like Houston, there are very few places where I can go to find a good variety of classical music CDs. That’s why this week my Dear Friend (DF) and I traveled to Old Town Spring to visit Classical Music of Spring. The people who work in this store know everything there is to know about the classical music genre and then some. If they don’t have what you are looking for in the shop, then they will order it for you.

Not only do they sell CD’s, but they also sell LPs for the retro crowd. I picked up a CD called Home Stretch by composer and pianist, Timo Andres. I especially like his work called, Paraphrase on Themes of Brian Eno. DF walked out with an armful of both CDs and LPs.

Now to understand the significance of this road trip, I will remind you that I drove to Old Town Spring. I live inside the Loop. This was far outside the loop. Even taking the toll road, it took 35 minutes to get there. Since retiring from my traditional day job, I very seldom drive outside the loop. I am a city gal. I am glad to report that Classical Music of Spring is worth the time and the distance.

Of course I still like to listen to the oldies from groups like Chicago and Pink Floyd. And I have added CDs by Imagine Dragons and Beck to my current collection.

Yet, it is still nice to relax to some wonderful classical music whether it is attending the symphony or listening to recordings in the comfort of my home. As in many aspects of life, it helps to know where and how to find what I’m looking for and I always enjoy the road trip.

Until next week.….

Groundhog Day.….Again!

Groundhog Day! One of the first early signs that we may have survived another Winter and Spring may just be around the corner? Such an odd custom. Depending on a groundhog to determine our future for the next six weeks. Just what exactly makes rodents so smart? How does such a custom come about?

In this country we need to look to the Dutch and German settlers. Back in the “old country” hedgehogs were used to predict weather. Apparently hedgehogs weren’t readily available for the settlers here, so they switched hedgehogs for groundhogs. Rodents are interchangeable? Who knew?

Is this really all about weather and agriculture? Or is this some Jungian tale of how we react when we see our shadow selves? What a fascinating tangent; however, it is a topic much larger than this blog will allow. Back to Groundhog Day…

Hollywood made a movie called Groundhog Day where the day kept repeating itself over and over until Bill Murray could figure out that Andie MacDowell was a catch. I would send you to Google to check this out, but I am guessing this movie will be showing on television several times this weekend. Just check the listings.

Of course if you keep going back in time, you will find that Groundhog Day was celebrated by the Pagans as Imbolc. It was one of the first rites of Spring. A re‐dedication to life and trust that soon plants would grow and that all of life would be renewed for another year. Then the Catholics came up with Candlemas. Again a celebration of re‐dedication to their faith.

However you slice up the cultural pie, this is a time when people look to the future. Even if you New Year resolutions have all fallen by the wayside, there is still hope for you to believe in the future and yourself.

As if in preparation, much of the country endured the Polar Vortex this week. Not only did the US Post Office not deliver, but there were even some bars in the Midwest that had to close, because the beer trucks couldn’t deliver. Talk about your weather emergencies!

Here in Houston, I spent some quality time on the road at the Houston Arboretum.

If you haven’t visited the Arboretum in a while, it has really changed. They are making some big changes as a result of the lasting effects of Hurricane Ike in 2008 and the Summer Drought of 2011. They are adding more ponds and walking paths. There is even a second entrance on the feeder road to the 610 Loop. So many paths to take. So much exploring to be done. If you haven’t visited here in a while, it is definitely worth an afternoon of strolling around to discover all that is new.

While I may not be ready for winter to be over, apparently Nature has other ideas. I even saw some of the early Texas wildflowers at the Arboretum. Can the bluebonnets be far behind?

In honor of this weekend of re‐dedication, new life, and the hopes of Spring, I re‐dedicate myself to writing and art. Writing projects continue even as I think up new ones.

Also, I have started another Art History class at the Glassell School of Art. We will talk in depth about lines, shapes, spaces, time and motion. We are even going to delve into the principles of design. I can’t wait!

I hope everyone has a great weekend! I will be practicing all kinds of creativity.

Until next time.….

3 Days, 3 Roads, 3 Adventures

Tuesday. Drove to Hermann Park with Dear Friend (DF). We wanted to spend some time outside on a beautiful cool day with art, squirrels and ducks. This particular park is a wonderful place to go for a walk. There are concrete paths, gravel paths, and lots of grass to walk on. There are also many trees, benches and picnic tables. DF and I walked and sat and walked and sat some more. We absorbed as much of the park as we could and committed it to memory. I took pictures with a real camera (as opposed to the camera on my phone).

This particular sculpture was a topic of discussion last year when I took the Women In Art class at the Glassell. The artist who created this piece was sculptor, Hannah Stewart. The title of the work is Atropos Key and is located on top of the hill at Miller Theater.

Since it was a weekday, there were not too many people. Foot traffic did pick up during the lunch hour with several people escaping an office setting to commune with nature. Some folks just walked and others sat on benches and visited with the ducks. Some folks walked alone, some in pairs and others in small groups. The squirrels kept an eye on everyone who wandered through.

Wednesday. DF was in the hospital getting ready for some surgery. Nothing major or life threatening, but necessary. Sometimes a road trip involves being wheeled around a hospital (or accompanying someone who is being wheeled around a hospital). From admitting room, to pre‐op holding room, to operating room, to recovery room, to hospital bedroom. I spent the day either by his bedside or sitting in the waiting room. Surgery was scheduled for 11:30 a.m., but he was not wheeled into the operating room until 1:00 p.m. He pulled through the surgery like a champ. Only a 5 hour wait in the recovery room before DF is moved to a private room. Once I was assured he was comfortable in his room and tucked in for the night, I left with the promise to return the next day to transport him home. Nurses checked on him every hour.

Both before and after surgery, we spent time in curtained cubicles where we caught some strange snippets of conversations.

A doctor said, “Your wound is safe. You could put WD40 on it and it still wouldn’t get infected. You won’t have any problem with a shower.”

A nurse said to a co‐worker, “No, it’s an hour and a half. Do not try to add another 1/2 hour to my life.”

A nurse said towards the end of the shift to someone we could not see,“I don’t like coffee. I don’t like the way it looks. I don’t like the way it smells. I don’t like the way it tastes. I don’t even like the look of coffee beans. Coffee is not my friend.

Thursday. DF and I had hoped for a hospital discharge by 11:00 a.m. No such luck. There were no more road trips around the hospital. Lots of waiting in the room. The nurse continued to visit every hour. Finally by 3:00 p.m. DF was sitting in a wheelchair on his way to the front door of the hospital.

Once out in the sunshine, we drove off in my car. We went to a drug store for meds and then to Brasil’s for an early dinner. I drove slowly through tree lined neighborhoods. Classical music played on the radio. Now life began to return to what can be considered normal.

Until next week.….

Coffee!

In a few weeks, I am going to have surgery. Nothing too serious, but it will hopefully have a very positive impact on my life. There’s just one problem. In order to do this, I have to stop drinking coffee.

WHAT??? STOP DRINKING COFFEE??? HAVE YOU LOST YOUR MIND???

Coffee. The elixir of life. The joy of my every morning. Sigh.

No, I don’t have to give it up forever, but for a little while. Since I don’t want to go through a caffeine withdrawal headache, I am weaning myself off of the bliss that is java. By now the coffee I am drinking is weak enough that I can see through it. Just about ready to move over to green tea. Oh, woe is me!

Having been raised in the South, I have a long‐standing friendship with caffeine. I was weaned on Coca Cola. Drank it every day in my youth. Iced Tea was the drink of choice with every supper. No, I did not drink sweet tea. I put my own sugar in my tea and stirred it and stirred it until my arm got tired.

I made the move to coffee sometime in high school. It was the 1970s and I can still see Joe DiMaggio in one of his many Mr. Coffee commercials. What? You don’t remember the Mr. Coffee commercials? Please take a moment now and go to YouTube where you will find several. I’ll wait until you come back.

In college I remember many a night going to a local diner with friends to talk and drink coffee until the wee hours of the morning. Study sessions in the dorm also required numerous “cups of Joe”.

By the time I became a working adult in the 1980s, I was drinking about a pot of coffee a day and smoking two packs of cigarettes. I was actually delusional enough back then to think that I was a laid back “Type B” personality. I know much better now. Lucky for me, I gave up the cigarettes a couple of decades ago. Coffee has remained my friend. I drink it black with a little sweetener. I no longer use sugar. Sometimes I will treat myself with a mocha coffee. Oftentimes chocolate can be just as sacred as coffee and the combination will fill my soul with exultation!

Oh, I have given up coffee at least twice in my life. Whenever I did this.….Time Stood Freakin’ Still. The earth literally slowed down in her rotations and felt like it was going to roll away into the universe. What do non‐caffeinated persons do with all of their extra time? I really have no idea.

Like I said earlier, this will be a temporary separation. I am already looking forward to having surgery behind me so I can drink my coffee in peace once again.

One last note: Here is a picture of the artist, Leslie Gaworecki and the picture she painted for Color:Story 2019 based on my essay called “Transitions”. Many thanks to both Leslie and Marlo Saucedo for coordinating this evening and preparing such wonderful works of art. Also, many thanks to those of you who were able to join us. There was a large crowd and everyone seemed to have a good time.

Until next week.….….